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The Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) is an air quality and climate laboratory in the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) which is a department within the USA's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

The Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) studies processes and develops models relating to climate and air quality, including the transport, dispersion, transformation and removal of pollutants from the ambient atmosphere. The emphasis of the ARL's work is on data interpretation, technology development and transfer. The specific goal of ARL research is to improve and eventually to institutionalize prediction of trends, dispersion of air pollutant plumes,[1][2] air quality, atmospheric deposition, and related variables.

ARL provides scientific and technical advice to elements of NOAA and other government agencies on atmospheric science, environmental problems, emergency assistance, and climate change.

ARL operates with research divisions in Idaho Falls, Idaho; Research Triangle Park, North Carolina; Boulder, Colorado; Las Vegas, Nevada; Oak Ridge, Tennessee; and Silver Spring, Maryland.

The Atmospheric Sciences Modeling DivisionEdit

The Atmospheric Science Division (ASMD) of the ARL was established in 1955 to collaborate with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and its predecessor agencies in developing advanced air quality models that can simulate the transport, dispersion and fate of pollutants in the atmosphere. The ASMD develops advanced modeling and decision support systems for effective forecasting and management of the air quality in the United States.

The ASMD develops and evaluates predictive atmospheric models on all spatial and temporal scales for forecasting air quality, and for assessing changes in air quality and air pollutant exposures, as affected by changes in ecosystem management and regulatory decisions. The ASMD is responsible for providing a sound scientific and technical basis for regulatory policies to improve ambient air quality. The models developed by the ASMD are being used by the EPA, NOAA, and the air pollution community in understanding and forecasting not only the magnitude of the air pollution problem, but also in developing emission control policies and regulations.

ReferencesEdit

  1. Turner, D.B. (1994), Workbook of atmospheric dispersion estimates: an introduction to dispersion modeling, CRC Press, ISBN: 156670023X.
    www.crcpress.com
  2. Beychok, Milton R., Fundamentals of Stack Gas Dispersion, (2005), 4th Edition, author-published, ISBN: 0964458802.
    www.air-dispersion.com


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